Born along Rapid Creek, “Indian Camp”, Rapid City, South Dakota in 1949, Goes In Center is considered one of the early silversmiths in the transitional modern era of Lakota metal work. To his credit is winning the Metalwork Division at the prestigious Northern Plains Tribal Arts show and recently again at the 2017 People Of The Plains Art Show.  Goes In Center has exhibited his work, lectured at the Smithsonian Institute’s Museum of Natural History and his work has been acquired by the National Museum of the American Indian.  Goes In Center considers the inclusion of one of his Lakota adornment pieces in an exhibition organized by Evan Maurer of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts his greatest honor.  The exhibition: Visions Of The People, A Pictorial History of Plains Indian Life is an overview of Plains Indian art and art history.

“A vision was presented to me through the ideals and values of the Lakota way of life. Since 1974 I have pursued a vision and found a medium of choice to express myself in an innovative way. I have chosen metal work, the techniques of metal engraving and the utilization of agates from the Lakota homelands.  My creations of personal adornment are the perfect art form.  The processes are exacting and challenging.  Metal, engraving and beautiful Lakota Agates…The wearer becomes my gallery and shows my work to the world.

Jhon Goes In Center

“Many artists portray the American Bison in various noble ways, but there was an event on the Great Plains whereby a Great Lakota Chief derived his name, Sitting Bull. Before this, his father possessed this name and passed it on. Then there are to be known, Two Sitting Bulls.

Jhon Goes In Center about "Tabloka Nunp Lyotake (Two Sitting Bulls)"